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Thread: What is Isaiah 1:17 saying would please God?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruminator View Post
    Okay, well that gives the fruit inspectors something to go by.

    So is Isaiah talking about social ills in general or strictly about within the Assemblies? In other words, will Jesus be a hungry sinner or only a hungry saint? Basically I'm asking, "Who is my neighbor?":[/QUOTE]

    Remember that in OT Israel, social life was also the assemblies! Israel still remains God's covenanted people and they lived and moved within the 613 commands of the Mosaic Law.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruminator View Post
    Here's the verse:



    It seems that Yehovah is fed up with sacrifices and wants the Jews to live in a way that pleases him. But is there a particular way he wants it done? How did he want the Jews to do these:

    "seek justice"
    "alleviate oppression"
    "defend orphans in court"
    "plead the widows' case"

    Is he speaking specifically to the rulers/leaders? Or were the people to do something about these social issues?

    Are these also required of NT leaders? Of NT saints in general?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDydKwmrHFo
    Hi, Ruminator.

    I believe it important to remember that God was speaking to the Jews as they.. the Jews, should live as a people.

    That is to say.. I don't believe that had NOTHING to do with how to deal with "the world".. know what I mean?.

    I take a cue from James:

    Jas 1:27 Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world.

    Again, that speaks of how to deal with the Church as believers.. not necessarily depending or "working with " the world.

    The Bible is for believers.
    2Co 11:1 I wish you would bear with me in a little foolishness. Do bear with me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWashedBrain View Post
    Hi, Ruminator.

    I believe it important to remember that God was speaking to the Jews as they.. the Jews, should live as a people.

    That is to say.. I don't believe that had NOTHING to do with how to deal with "the world".. know what I mean?.

    I take a cue from James:

    Jas 1:27 Religion that is pure and undefiled before God the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world.

    Again, that speaks of how to deal with the Church as believers.. not necessarily depending or "working with " the world.

    The Bible is for believers.
    I completely understand why you would say that and it might be correct but then what are we to make of the story of the "good Samaritan"? Who is Jesus trying to say is one's neighbor?
    It's a wonderful life

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruminator View Post
    Here's the verse:



    It seems that Yehovah is fed up with sacrifices and wants the Jews to live in a way that pleases him. But is there a particular way he wants it done? How did he want the Jews to do these:

    "seek justice"
    "alleviate oppression"
    "defend orphans in court"
    "plead the widows' case"

    Is he speaking specifically to the rulers/leaders? Or were the people to do something about these social issues?

    Are these also required of NT leaders? Of NT saints in general?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDydKwmrHFo
    The reason why the Lord informs the Jews in Isaiah 1:17 to seek justice and alleviate oppression is because they preferred (and prefer today) to do the opposite for profit (Micah 2:2).
    And this preference for profit is the curse the entire world follows (Zechariah 5:3).

    Micah 2:2 And they covet fields, and take them by violence; and houses, and take them away: so they oppress a man and his house, even a man and his heritage.

    Zechariah 5:3 Then said he unto me, This is the curse that goeth forth over the face of the whole earth: for every one that stealeth shall be cut off as on this side according to it; and every one that sweareth shall be cut off as on that side according to it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruminator View Post
    I completely understand why you would say that and it might be correct but then what are we to make of the story of the "good Samaritan"? Who is Jesus trying to say is one's neighbor?
    Jesus overthrew the atratus quo of the religious crowd (not faith crowd) of His day and those commands still stand in harsh contrast to those who wish to be happy being just religious.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nolidad View Post
    Jesus overthrew the atratus quo of the religious crowd (not faith crowd) of His day and those commands still stand in harsh contrast to those who wish to be happy being just religious.
    Thanks nolidad. Do you have an opinion on the implications of the "who is my neighbor" passage on understanding this?
    It's a wonderful life

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruminator View Post
    Thanks nolidad. Do you have an opinion on the implications of the "who is my neighbor" passage on understanding this?
    Yeah- anyone we see who has a need is our neighbor. I believe the good samaritan is a true story. But even if but a parable- Jesus slammed the pharisees hard. For the Jews hated the Samaritans and forced them to admit that one who the Jews thought of as ungodly acted more Godly than the pharisee and priest who passed by the beasten Jew on the road!

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    Quote Originally Posted by nolidad View Post
    Yeah- anyone we see who has a need is our neighbor. I believe the good samaritan is a true story. But even if but a parable- Jesus slammed the pharisees hard. For the Jews hated the Samaritans and forced them to admit that one who the Jews thought of as ungodly acted more Godly than the pharisee and priest who passed by the beasten Jew on the road!
    Thanks. It strikes me, though to be unlike the rest of the scriptures which always seem mute or equivocal about the concerns of unbelievers.
    It's a wonderful life

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruminator View Post
    I completely understand why you would say that and it might be correct but then what are we to make of the story of the "good Samaritan"? Who is Jesus trying to say is one's neighbor?
    I don't see how that follows your OP. Oh well, I guess you are allowed to derail your own thread (lol)

    Just to clarify..

    Do you remember when Jesus said:

    Mat 5:43 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’


    I guess the Jews "said" that in that they wanted to follow, as best they could, God's edict that they (the Jews) should be a people set aside. Understandable somewhat, no?

    Something to consider.

    Lev 19:18 You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against the sons of your own people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD.


    Seems pretty clear that "your neighbor" refers back to "the sons of your own people".

    Again.. I believe the concept of your original question is the Jews as a separate people.. not taking into account "the world".

    Again and again God dealt very harshly with those peoples that He had the Jews "persuade" to leave their lands to them.

    re the issue of the good samaritan..

    Luk 10:36 Which of these three, do you think, proved to be a neighbor to the man who fell among the robbers?”
    Luk 10:37 He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” And Jesus said to him, “You go, and do likewise.”


    Interesting that the original question was "who is my neighbor?"

    The "lesson" seems to imply that the neighbor was NOT the man who fell among robbers.. but rather the Samaritan.

    In essence, Jesus is saying that it is US who must be neighbors (doing the right thing at that) regardless of who it is that is in need.

    So, a neighbor is NOT anyone and everyone around you necessarily.. but Christians should be neighbors of all.
    2Co 11:1 I wish you would bear with me in a little foolishness. Do bear with me!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheWashedBrain View Post
    ...The "lesson" seems to imply that the neighbor was NOT the man who fell among robbers.. but rather the Samaritan.

    In essence, Jesus is saying that it is US who must be neighbors (doing the right thing at that) regardless of who it is that is in need.

    So, a neighbor is NOT anyone and everyone around you necessarily.. but Christians should be neighbors of all.
    Nicely done!
    It's a wonderful life

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