Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 51 to 53 of 53

Thread: Greek question John 1:3-4

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Portland, ME
    Posts
    7,332
    Thanks
    949
    Thanked 852 Times in 724 Posts
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnB View Post
    Koine does have punctuation. It may be primitive but it is there.

    https://billmounce.com/greekalphabet...yllabification

    JohnB
    I don't see it in the Mounce article but weren't the diacritical marks added much later?
    It's a wonderful life

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Henrietta NY
    Posts
    1,614
    Thanks
    1,006
    Thanked 415 Times in 335 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruminator View Post
    I don't see it in the Mounce article but weren't the diacritical marks added much later?
    I will be out of town until Monday. I had a few photos of a few of the oldest fragments with punctuation.

    I will check to see if I still have them

    JohnB
    How far must someone fall before they hit their head? b

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Portland, ME
    Posts
    7,332
    Thanks
    949
    Thanked 852 Times in 724 Posts
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnB View Post
    I will be out of town until Monday. I had a few photos of a few of the oldest fragments with punctuation.

    I will check to see if I still have them

    JohnB
    No problem. Actually, you inspired me to check it out as well and here's what I found:

    Punctuation

    A section of the Codex Alexandrinus containing Luke 12:5413:4.
    The comma (,) and full-stop (.) are used as in English. The colon or semicolon is a point above the line (). The Greek question mark ; looks like the English semicolon.
    Inverted commas are often used to denote speech. Capital letters are used at the beginning of paragraphs, sentences (depending on publisher), proper names, and the beginning of quotations.
    In actual Greek texts from the era when Koine Greek was used as a day-to-day language, Greek was usually written with no punctuation. The words ran together completely, with no spacing or markup. Accents, breathing marks, spaces, and other punctuation are added at a much later time, making texts easier to read.
    Many of the earliest partial manuscripts of the New Testament do have punctuation. Due to the high cost of the factors of input (ink, paper), punctuation was quickly excluded, to be re-included later by textual scholars (not unlike the adding of vowel-markers to the Biblical Hebrew and Aramaic texts by the Masoretes).
    https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Koine_...nd_Punctuation
    It's a wonderful life

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Ruminator For This Useful Post:

    JohnB (04-20-2017)

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •